Monthly Archives: September 2015

HERE IS A METHOD FOR AN (emergency scope ZERO check).

IF YOU DROP YOUR GUN AND YOU DON’T KNOW IF IT IS STILL ZEROED. . .

You can CHECK YOUR  a 100 yd. ZERO in the field by firing a shot AT THE CORRESPONDING CLOSE RANGE ZERO.  

Measured the distance as good as you can because a little error means ALOT).  If your going away from home on a $4500.+ hunt you may want to carry a piece of string cut at the right length the muzzle to the corresponding short range zero.

EXAMPLE:   If you were originally sighted in at 100 yards with the Lightfield Mag 20ga than your close range zero point is 18 yards. Fire a shot at a measured 18yards off of a rest, as best you can. If the shot is dead on or just touching the point of aim then the gun is still zeroed at 100 yards. If  you are more than 1/2″ off the point of aim, you should make the appropriate scope adjustment back to the point of aim.

NOTE: All 100 yards numbers are in bold black type.

 ITEM

Yardage your gun was
ZEROED AT:
example 100 (YDS.)

 THE CLOSE RANGE ZERO 

18 (YDS.)


3″ MAG-20
150 10.7
 125  13.7
 100 (yards zero)  18.0 yards close range zero
   50  39.5
 HYBRED EXP 20 GA.  125 11.0
 100 14.0
   75  20.2
   50  24.6
 HYBRED LITES  125    8.7
 100  11.0
   75  15.8
   50  24.6
 HYBRED EXP  150  8.2
 100  13.0
   75  19.0
   50  29.6
3″ HYBRED ELITE   200    7.4
 175    8.9
 150  11.1
 100  18.0
   50  40.8
3″ COMMANDER PLUS  225    6.0
 175    8.7
 125  13.0
 100  18.0
   50  39.5
3 1/2″ COMMANDER PLUS  250    6.2
 225    7.3
 175  10.6
 125  16.0
 100  14.0
   50  48.2
COMMANDER 16 GA.  150   8.5
 125  10.7
 100  14.0
   50  30.8

 

Over the years, there have been hundreds of questions asking about the use of mechanical recoil limiting rests to zero slug guns such as:

“Would it be a wise move to build or use a locking type/heavy rest that would take all human error out of the process of sighting in a slug gun, except knowing when to pull the trigger because of the wind?”

The problem is when you use this type of rest, you artificially make the gun much heavier, more solid, than it is when used in the field.. You will end up sighting the gun in at a heavier artificial weight with a certain amount of muzzle jump. Then when you shoot the gun at game in the field at its normal weight, it WILL SHOOT to a different point of aim because