Shooting Resources

Bolt Action Rifled Slug Guns

The bottom line is that if you overlook or fall short on even one of the factors that make up proper slug gun shooting technique you will not be consistent with your shot placement.

Why is there all this talk about the need for slug gun accuracy since, after all, most deer are taken inside of 100 yards? The answer is pure and simple shot placement. At 100 yards with a Foster style slug you actually have limited control over where your slug will land on the deer, even with the most perfect hold. With rifled barrels and saboted slugs you can place your shot exactly where you want it, where it ought to go, especially at extended ranges. You can even thread your slug with confidence through narrow gaps in vegetation and be sure that the slug is going to travel precisely along your sight path.
“The technique required to reproducibly shoot tight slug groupings is unlike that required to be a proficient with a rifle,” stated Randy Fritz as he proceeded to drive his point home with a demonstration. Shooting Lightfield Commander 3″ slugs through one of his custom TarHunt slug guns Randy proceeded to coax five slugs in a row through the same hole at 50 yards. He then turned the bench over to a self-proclaimed ‘good shot’ who fired his best five shots but could only muster a 4 inch grouping at the same 50 yard target.

What was the difference? Both shooters were using the exact same gun, the exact same lot of Lightfield sabot slugs and were firing under the same conditions, but one was driving nails and the other couldn’t hit the broad side of a barn. The difference was in their shooting technique. A person can purchase the most expensive state-of-the-art slug gun and fire the best saboted slugs money can buy, but if that person doesn’t know and hasn’t practiced proper slug gun shooting technique all the dollars invested will have been for naught.

The fact is that once you have a good gun and are shooting good ammunition, 100% of group size at any distance is directly attributable to your shooting technique. Within our website’s ‘Shooting Guide’ we have detailed the information that the novice as well as the seasoned shooter can use to improve their slug gun shooting technique.

Yes, our TarHunt slug guns will produce 1 inch shot groupings at 100 yards, but only if the shooter …

  • Is using a good lot of saboted slug ammunition
  • Is using a telescope that will continue to work for more than 100 rounds
  • Remembers to always use a range-finder to check target distance prior to taking any shot
  • Has a good rest to shoot off of, and has spent the time necessary to learn how to shoot well off of it
  • Has zeroed their gun at 50 yards
  • Will spend the time to learn the intricacies of shooting slugs at 100 yards

All results detailed within our website’s ‘Shooting Guide’ were produced while shooting a TarHunt custom rifled barrel slug gun and Lightfield saboted slugs, each a standard for accuracy within the shooting industry and together are capable of producing optimal groupings at all effective ranges. Your results will vary greatly depending upon the model gun and type of ammunition you are using, the amount of time you spend on the range, as well as other factors. We do not guarantee that you will be able to shoot one inch groups using our shooting techniques.

ThinkstockPhotos-200321708-001
Sep
2

Emergency Close Range Zeroing Points for Lightfield Ammo

HERE IS A METHOD FOR AN (emergency scope ZERO check). IF YOU DROP YOUR GUN AND YOU DON’T KNOW IF IT IS STILL ZEROED. . . You can CHECK YOUR  a 100 yd. ZERO in the field by firing a shot AT THE CORRESPONDING CLOSE RANGE ZERO.   Measured the distance as good as you can because a [...] Read More
Sep
2

Recoil Reducing and Mechanical Rests

Over the years, there have been hundreds of questions asking about the use of mechanical recoil limiting rests to zero slug guns such as: “Would it be a wise move to build or use a locking type/heavy rest that would take all human error out of the process of sighting in a slug gun, except […]

Read More
Sep
2

Tuning Your Muzzleloader for Accuracy

The base of a muzzleloading sabot must expand and form the proper gas seal for your gun. This is dependent on two factors, the density of the sabot baser and the powder charge.

Read More
Sep
2

Shooting Range Tips & Wind Flag Placement

You’ve resigned yourself to the fact that you are going to take the time and effort to get out to the range to zero your gun and to do some target shooting. Here are some tips that will make your time on the range a little more rewarding. It may seem like a lot of trouble, […]

Read More
Sep
2

Designated Slug Gun Safety

From the time you pick up a firearm until the time you put it back down you become part of a system over which you have complete control and responsibility, You are the only part of the system that can make a gun safe … or unsafe. Please read the following safety rules carefully and […]

Read More
Sep
2

Rifled Slug Gun Safety

From the time you pick up a firearm until the time you put it back down you become part of a system over which you have complete control and responsibility, You are the only part of the system that can make a gun safe …, or unsafe. Please read the following safety rules carefully and […]

Read More
Aug
27

Slug Gun Facts

TarHunt built its first prototype slug gun in 1987 and began the manufacture of our first production model in 1990. Between that time and the present the one factor that has become the most evident is that our guns are not magic for the shooter.

Read More
Aug
27

Tips on Storing Your Slugs

Between hunting seasons and shooting sessions seal your unused slugs in a zip lock bag and pack them in a Styrofoam cooler.  Store the cooler in an area of your home where the humidity is as low as possible and the temperature stays between 50 and 70 degrees Fahrenheit year-round.  The more stable you keep […]

Read More
Aug
27

Shooting Off A Rest

There are a lot of similarities between shooting rifles off the bench and shooting slug guns, however knowing and practicing the differences can equate to putting more meat in your freezer.

Read More
Aug
27

Zeroing A Slug Gun

Slug guns must be zeroed (sighted-in) at a distance where the slug will impact the target while still in the supersonic phase of its flight. Most slugs become subsonic, travelling less than 1220 feet per second, slightly beyond a muzzle distance of 50 yards, thus making 50 yards the ideal zeroing distance. Zeroing at 50 yards also cuts down, by approximately 60%, the chance of adjusting Windage error into your scope setting.

Read More